What You Need to Know to Solve SSAT Analogies When You Don’t Know the Meaning of Both Stem Words

Terri of Prepped and Polished tells you how to solve the hardest of analogies when you don’t know the meaning of both stem words.

TRANSCRIPTION:

Hi, I’m Terri with Prepped and Polished in South Natick, Massachusetts. Thank you so much for joining us today.

Today, I’m gonna dive a little deeper into an advanced strategy that I actually reviewed before in a previous blog, how to solve the hardest of analogies when you don’t know the meaning of both stem words. Let me show you a winning strategy.

So back solving, you can call it that, is an advanced strategy when you don’t know the meaning of both stem words and you want to work backward as much as you can. In other words, go straight to the answer choices because, obviously, you don’t know the meaning of the stem words, so you want to go right to the answer choices and try to make definitional sentences with them. So, which ones are not likely to be correct and you can eliminate. Eliminate the ones in which the words are not related in such a way that you need one to define the other. In other words, there’s not a clear, concise definitional relationship.

Let me show you a very hard example that none of my students can get correct, and I’ve been showing them this method. Now, “Lax is to resolution as…” Most students don’t know the meaning of lax or resolution other than maybe New Year’s Resolutions. And I’m gonna show you the answer choices. I did write the definitions just to help you out to show you how this works. If you find that you don’t know any of these words, you probably should start reviewing more vocabulary for the SSAT.

So, hapless is to circumstance. Well, hapless means unlucky, and circumstance is an existing condition. There’s really no way to define one with the other, so we’re gonna eliminate that.
Detrimental is to destruction. Detrimental means harmless, destruction means destroyed. They’re both negative, but it would be a stretch to define one in terms of the other.

Deceitful is to sincerity. You know, deceitful means misleading or tricky, and sincerity means genuine or free of deceit. They seem to be opposites. You could say deceitful is the opposite of sincerity, which is a definitional relationship. I’m going to put a question mark.

But we want to look at the last two. Vulnerable is to injury. Vulnerable means capable of being hurt. Injury is a wound. You know, yes, they both have to do with being hurt, but vulnerable could even be emotional hurt. Really not a good definitional relationship.

Accessible is to rewarded. Accessible means easy to approach, reach, enter. Rewarded means compensated for good service, merit, or achievement. So that, really, they’re not related. So C is our answer, and yes, deceitful is the opposite of sincerity, could it be that lax is the opposite of resolution? And it is because lax means careless and resolution means determined, and they are opposite. So lax is the opposite of resolution, just as deceitful is the opposite of sincerity. It’s the most clear, concise definitional relationship. And that’s how you could possibly, you know, ferret out the right answer here.

Analogies may seem frightening, but with practice you can solve even the hardest of analogies when you don’t know the meaning of both stem words. If you enjoyed these tips today, give us a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel. If you want tutoring, either online or in person, simply email info@preppedandpolished.com and we’ll be glad to help you. Good luck.

What was your biggest takeaway from this video tutorial about how to solve the hardest of analogies when you don’t know the meaning of both stem words? Do you have any question for Terri and Alexis Avila?

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By | 2018-07-27T04:57:04+00:00 March 31st, 2018|Featured, SSAT|0 Comments

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